Death's End

Death's End

Book - 2016
Average Rating:
Rate this:
17
1
With The Three-Body Problem , English-speaking readers got their first chance to experience the multiple-award-winning and bestselling Three-Body Trilogy by China's most beloved science fiction author, Cixin Liu. Three-Body was released to great acclaim including coverage in The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. It was also named a finalist for the Nebula Award, making it the first translated novel to be nominated for a major SF award since Italo Calvino's Invisible Cities in 1976. Now this epic trilogy concludes with Death's End . Half a century after the Doomsday Battle, the uneasy balance of Dark Forest Deterrence keeps the Trisolaran invaders at bay. Earth enjoys unprecedented prosperity due to the infusion of Trisolaran knowledge. With human science advancing daily and the Trisolarans adopting Earth culture, it seems that the two civilizations will soon be able to co-exist peacefully as equals without the terrible threat of mutually assured annihilation. But the peace has also made humanity complacent. Cheng Xin, an aerospace engineer from the early 21st century, awakens from hibernation in this new age. She brings with her knowledge of a long-forgotten program dating from the beginning of the Trisolar Crisis, and her very presence may upset the delicate balance between two worlds. Will humanity reach for the stars or die in its cradle?
Publisher: New York : Tor, a Tom Doherty Associates Book ; 2016
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ℗♭2016
ISBN: 9780765377104
0765377101
Characteristics: 604 pages ; 25 cm
Additional Contributors: Liu, Ken 1976-- Translator

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment
s
scribby
Aug 13, 2020

The “Three Body Problem” trilogy concludes with this huge tome. Like the second in the series, “The Dark Forest”, this is really two books in one: the plot (actually the plot of the entire series!) abruptly changes halfway through and everything re-focusses. What emerges is a galactic game of Can-You-Top-This, extrapolating farther and farther into the imagined future, grander and grander engineering and scientific projects, …and into an ever darker and nastier universe. Fragments of other storylines emerge, each complex enough to spawn a possible separate book; but these merely emphasize (rather than distract from) what amounts to cosmic nihilism. Some other storylines never come to fruition. By the end, we have read a grand, dark, cosmological epic — but also a biting critique on civilization, paranoia, war, and the tendency of societies to wall themselves off. In this case, the wall might be better than the alternative, with the very nature of timespace weaponized. The title? Oh yes, there are some survivors as the universe is reset, but we readers wonder if this “death’s end” is really a positive possibility.

u
useapencil
Mar 27, 2020

The final book in Cixin Liu's brilliant series. We meet a new character, Cheng Xin, and follow her across centuries and beyond. The strength of these books, from my seat in the audience, is they feel grounded. The author goes on wild flights of speculation, ending on the scale of the universe, but is careful to respect the physics. The weak spot in these stories, if there is one, is the religious speculation. They feel contrived - as they often do in science fiction. Perhaps it is cultural. What turns into a religious movement in Chinese culture may not translate well on to western culture.

Well done stories, deserving of their awards. We are fortunate the effort was made to get them in English.

n
naylord
Jan 05, 2020

A satisfying conclusion to an excellent trilogy but compared to the first two entries the dizzying scope across space and time prevents this from having the narrative and thematic coherence of the first two entries. Well worth reading once you've finished the first two though.

j
JLMason
Dec 24, 2019

The Three Body trilogy is a masterpiece of science fiction in the tradition of science-based authors like Robinson and Heinlein, spanning a multi-millennial time frame like Asimov’s Foundation series in a story driven by character like Le Guin. In the dark forest that is the universe, unknown alien cultures wield the laws of physics to kill or be killed. Many threads weave through the three books, coming together at critical junctures over the centuries to create opportunity or disaster. This final book determines the fate of the human race and of the universe. How did Cixin Liu, a power plant engineer, imagine something so vast, complex, and astounding? The ending is both profound and full of hope.

IndyPL_SteveB Nov 10, 2019

The third and final book in the immense Chinese trilogy that began with *The Three-Body Problem* (Hugo Award winner) and *The Dark Forest*. These books are challenging, disturbing, and sometimes terrifying. They have the longest time perspective of any book I have ever read – billions of years. I was totally gripped – and yet the writing is a bit stiff, the characters are stiffer, and the plot is mostly an excuse for philosophy, physics, and speculation about the nature of life and the universe. I tend to prefer novels with excellent characterization and tight plots. In spite of that, because of the IDEAS, these three books are some of the most fascinating novels I have ever read, and the third book is the best one of the series.

The key to the series is investigating a basic question – How can humans survive in a universe that may include equally hostile or nervous races, all afraid that everyone else might be out to get them? What philosophy and technology prevails?

Liu moves some of his characters ahead through time where they discover the many ways a civilization or a section of the universe can be destroyed. Along the way, the reader needs to learn how to think in four dimensions and two dimensions, how to slow down the speed of light, how to protect himself from exploding stars, and how to adjust to great leaps forward in time. It is mind-expanding, humbling, and not a little frightening. This is some of the most creative *science* fiction I have ever read, with several ideas I have never seen anywhere before.

j
JLMason
Oct 01, 2019

The Three Body trilogy is a masterpiece of science fiction in the tradition of science-based authors like Robinson and Heinlein, spanning a multi-millennial time frame like Asimov’s Foundation series in a story driven by character like Le Guin. In the dark forest that is the universe, unknown alien cultures wield the laws of physics to kill or be killed. Many threads weave through the three books, coming together at critical junctures over the centuries to create opportunity or disaster. This final book determines the fate of the human race and of the universe. How did Cixin Liu, a power plant engineer, imagine something so vast, complex, and astounding? The ending is both profound and full of hope.

t
tjdickey
Mar 23, 2019

The breathtaking conclusion to the "three-body problem" trilogy, and the most philosophical novel of them all. Prepare to have your ideas of basic linear narrative challenged, and your thoughts about the destiny of mankind and all civilization in the solar system, even the nature of the physical universe. Along the way, Liu explores love and fear, and the cosmological experience of advanced civilizations. The climax reminds one of, but far surpasses, both "Foundation" and Kubrick's Space Odyssey, for scope and breadth of mind-blowing imagination.

d
dnk
Mar 05, 2019

This series was incredible, and Cixin Liu is one of the best writers I've ever read in any genre. He is certainly one of the most thorough; at least a third of the series length can be attributed to Liu following the strands for every theory posited by his characters and making sure no loose ends are left. Whereas some long books feel like a slog the author's created to make sure they met a certain word-length, the lengths of these books felt not just satisfying but necessary.

I find it ironic that so many find these book sexist because the person who kicks off the action and, in a way, determines the fate of the universe is a woman (Ye Wenjie) with complicated but understandable motivations. And much as readers might get lost in the theoretical physics explored in the later books, I think she is the key to what Liu is really getting at. Ye Wenjie's journey is kicked off by the intellectual as well as physical violence of China's Cultural Revolution, and it's impossible to read the story of a civilization struggling with the choices of exploration and deep cover and not see China's history from the last three or four centuries. At one point, someone warns that once human beings are set off deep into space, they won't be human beings anymore; in other words, they beg the question of what, exactly, they are trying to preserve. I think it's essential to go back to the very beginning of Ye Wenjie's story and ask if every bit of that is worth preserving. (Please do not read this as indictment of the Chinese, since similar things can be said of the U.S and, indeed, most other countries.)

Absolutely fantastic conclusion to one of the best series I have ever read.

c
cosmickate
Dec 26, 2018

Bk 3 of Trilogy: the three-body problem

v
velowallah
Sep 02, 2018

In some way, this is the anti Star Trek. While the series is fundamentally optimistic, with a universe populated with species that usually try to have mutually beneficial relationships with others, this author's universe is ruled by the simple principle that every species out there will destroy any other if they find it.

I was kept intrigued enough to keep going, but found many long sections quite tedious. The last two books could easily have been condensed into one. This said, some of the ideas were quite captivating, and the end certainly lives up to the idea of a big picture.

Unfortunately, as many have mentioned, the deep sexism that permeates the entire trilogy is hard to accept.

View All Comments

Quotes

Add a Quote
h
hdebeck
Sep 05, 2017

Time is the cruelest force of all.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at GRPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top