Frequent The Nation contributor Mychal Denzel Smith's memoir not only skillfully, reflectively recounts some of the most formative experiences of his life, but also incisively examines the evolving national dialogue about race. Within this framework, he's able to consider the deeper perspective of a dialogue that assumes a black male, when in fact there are implications for gender, sexual orientation, mental health, and other marginalizing attributes. He dexterously weaves personal stories with analysis and criticism, creating a taut narrative that is at once a timely perspective and a timeless, essential thread in the highly contentious national dialogue around race.

On a personal note, I know that peers who agree with his perspective will love it, and, much like me, gain new facets to their perspective, but it is one of the few books that I wish those who claim to be "color-blind" in terms of race and [attribute]-blind would take the time to read this book. I truly hope it will change and further the dialogue in meaningful ways. If any book can it's this one.

gabegaloshes's rating:
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