When construction contractors discover the unthinkable under the floor of her family's guesthouse, Rowan and her best friend James decide themselves to investigate, independently of the police, how the nearly 100-year-old skeleton with a crushed skull came to be buried on her family's property. As clues lead them into the past, Rowan and James come face-to-face with a painful and shameful event in Tulsa's history. The story is told via parallel timelines: through Rowan's eyes we view the present, but the events of the past are told through the lens of Will Tillman, a white teenager directly involved in the violence of 1921.

When this book percolated to the top of my to-read list, I have to admit that I didn't remember why I'd added it back in 2017, but I became eager to dig in when I realized that it centers around the Tulsa race massacre because I had not too long ago listened to a SYMIHC podcast about that very incident. The subject matter is presented with both frankness and sensitivity, and there are a number of moments for the contemporary reader to reflect on what they might have done when faced with similar circumstances. Recommended, particularly in conjunction with education in the Civil Rights Movement and the Jim Crow era.

ryner's rating:
[]
[]
To Top